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New Jersey Divorce Cases and PostJudgment Motions and Trial Costs

Oct 4, 2016 @ 11:34 AM — by Michael Green

New Jersey Divorce Cases and NJ PostJudgment Motions and New Jersey Family Court Trial Costs.  There are times where the parties cannot agree to terms of their divorce or a plenary hearing is ordered as to postjudgment motions for a case.  Parties should be well aware that there are many costs associated with any trial, preparation and copying of exhibits, generally four copies are required, review of the entire file from its beginning, drafting of a trial brief and memorandum of law, costs associated with experts and their attendance, and costs of the attorney and their paralegal for preparing the file and preparing witnesses for testimony at trial, then there is the attendance at trial and of course the travel to and from the courtroom.Very often, parties must wait for the case to be called by the Judge and the parties must pay for the attorneys to wait in the court until their case is called as well.

New Jersey Divorce and Settling PostJudgment Motions Before or After a Plenary Hearing about Child Custody, Child Support or Alimony

Jul 11, 2016 @ 10:07 AM — by Michael Green

New Jersey Divorce and Settling PostJudgment Motions Before or After a Plenary Hearing about Child Custody, Child Support or Alimony.  As I have blogged previously, the Courts in New Jersey divorces these days are ordering more and more plenary hearings, mini-trials, where the parties give testimony under oath and submit evidence as well as present witnesses.  More and more, issues of relocation, child custody, and modifications of alimony are not decided at the filing and hearing of a motion, but are decided after a plenary hearing by a divorce court in the State of New Jersey.  Appellate case law has pushed many Judges in postjudgment motions, motions after judgment of divorce have been entered, to decide that there a burden has been met by the party seeking the relief of the motion that a prima facie case of  "substantial change in circumstance"  has been shown to justify a plenary hearing.